Aderinola T.A (Publications)
Publisher Faculty Of Biotechnology And Food Sciences (Slovak University Of Agriculture In Nitra)
Publication Type Journal
Publication Title Effect Of Sodium Benzoate On The Shelf Life Of Kunu-zaki Supplemented With Groundnut
Publication Authors Aderinola, T. A. and Oluwamukomi, M.O.
Year Published 2014
Abstract

The quality parameters of kunu-zaki  supplemented with groundnut was investigated in this study. Millet, groundnut, ginger, dry red pepper and sugar were used for the production.  After production, some samples were pasteurized at 700C for 30 minutes and stored at refrigerated  (oC)  and  ambient  conditions  (oC).  A fresh  control  sample  was  also  prepared  at  interval  for  comparison.  Analyses  were carried out to determine the chemical composition, microbiological and sensory qualities of product during storage over a per iod of twenty seven (27) days.  Results showed that addition of groundnut improved chemical composition of the fresh samples. It could be attributed to the crude protein and the fat content in the added groundnut. The results were: moisture, 75.7%; crude protein, 13.06%; fat, 7.35%; ash, 0.39% and carbohydrate, 3.5%. The pH values for the fresh samples were: 3.31 (pasteurized refrigerated); 3.31 (pasteurized unrefrigerated); 3.57 (unpasteurized refrigerated); 3.64 (unpasteurized unrefrigerated) and 3.93 for the Fresh sample. The results of the mineral element (mg/100g) were: Ca, 152; Na, 0.19; Mg, 4.76; K,  2.74 and P, 123.22. There was no detection of the presence of the indicator organism  –  E coli. Results of the sensory evaluation of the product carried out using a five-man panel showed that there were no differences in the appearance, taste and flavor for the first day. However, the pasteurized refrigerated sample with the addition of sodium benzoate was better on the overall acceptability


Publisher OMICS Publishing Group
Publication Type Journal
Publication Title Physicochemical And Rheological Behavior Of African Star Apple (Chrysophyllum Albidium) Juice As Affected By Concentration And Temperature Variation
Publication Authors Awolu, O.O., Aderinola, T.A. and Adebayo, I.A.
Year Published 2013
Abstract

The  viscosity,  shear  stress  and  shear  rate  of  African  star  apple  juice  (Chrysophyllum  albidium)  at  different concentrations of 8 % to 32% total solid concentration and temperature range of 20°C to 70°C were obtained in order to determine the effect of changes in concentration and temperature on the rheological properties of the juice. Also, the physico-chemical analyses of the sample were carried out. Plot of shear stress against shear rate showed that at all concentrations, African star apple juice behaved as a non-Newtonian fluid at temperature below 60°C. At 70°C, however, lower concentration (8% and 12%) behaves non-Newtonian while higher concentrations behave Newtonian. Increase temperature decreases the viscosity of the juice. The knowledge of rheological properties of African star apple juice is essential for the design and optimization of energy process and heat transfer. 


Publisher Faculty Of Biotechnology And Food Sciences, Nitra, Slovakia
Publication Type Journal
Publication Title Quality And Microbiological Evaluation Of African Yam Bean Yoghurt Supplemented With Cow Milk
Publication Authors Aderinola, T.A. and Olanrewaju, Z.Y.
Year Published 2014
Abstract

0px; > The utilization of African yam bean for the production of yoghurt substituted with cow milk was studied. African yam bean milk was extracted from dehulled seed, pasteurized and fermented with Yoghurmet® in ratios with reconstituted cow milk powder in the ratios 50:50, 70:30, 90:10, 100:0 and 0:100 (African yam bean milk:Cow milk). Sample 0:100 which was 100% cow milk yoghurt served as
the control. The samples were stored for 14 days at 4oC and 3 days at room temperature. The results of the proximate composition of the fresh samples in percentages are; Moisture: 82.76, 81.62, 83.62, 86.53 and 85.42. Total solids: 17.25, 18.47, 16.35, 13.47and14.57. Protein: 5.93, 4.27, 5.87, 5.57 and 5.14. Ash: 0.94, 0.83, 0.91, 0.90 and 0.87. Fat: 1.07, 2.53, 1.18, 1.45 and 1.75. Carbohydrate: 9.09,
10.73, 8.33, 5.53 and 6.78 for the samples 100:0, 0:100, 90:10, 70:30 and 50:50 respectively. The moisture, total solids, fat and carbohydrate contents differed significantly (p≤0.05) in all the samples. The protein content of 100:0 and 90:0 did not differ significantly but differs in other samples. 0:100 differ significantly from other samples in ash content. There was no fiber in the samples. The total viable microbial count was highest in 70:30 (1×107cfu/ml) for refrigerated storage samples while 50:50 (9.5×106cfu/ml) had the highest count in room temperature storage samples. There were no yeasts/moulds enumerated in the refrigerated storage samples while yeast/moulds appeared in 100:0 (3×106cfu/ml) and 70:30 (1×106cfu/ml) on the 3rd day of room temperature storage. The titratable
acidity of all the samples increased gradually throughout the storage period while their pH decreased. The specific gravity of the samples also decreased gradually throughout the storage period. The anti-nutritional composition of the samples containing African yam bean was also determined. The sensory properties showed that samples stored at refrigeration temperature maintained good quality up to 14 days of storage and that sample 50:50 was most preferred.